Friday, September 19, 2008

She Speaks - CEO Anne Mulcahy

X Woman, by Michael Fitzgerald, Q & A

I found this article and pulled out some interesting parts -

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You have things in your labs like invisible ink and erasable paper, which lets the print on the pages dissolve after a day or two so that they can be reused. Is part of your goal to reduce the amount of paper that companies use?

Absolutely. We want to help our customers print less. This is the information world, and content management is a very big deal. A lot of what we do in our services business is help people go from paper to digital, help people create content that’s searchable, help people really live in a world of smart documents versus dumb documents. Documents that actually have embedded intelligence in them.

You still sell copiers, but not very many of them.

We don’t sell any stand-alone copiers. Everything we sell is networked. Most of it is multifunctional. It copies, it prints, it scans, it faxes. So most of it is really part of the networked world. And almost half of what we sell is now full color.

You said that by 2008 you wanted 10 percent of the pages Xerox prints to be color, and right now you’re ahead of that. The company’s at 16 percent.

It’s going to be 100 percent, because the world we live in is in color. And color is growing by double digits right now. Also, digital technology is letting us do things like print-on-demand and one-to-one marketing. Offset printing, the method usually used for marketing materials, is a $400 billion market. Only a small slice of it has gone to digital. One of the things we’re starting to enter into is digital packaging for consumer-product companies. We recently did a demo for a gum wrapper. Consumers can create their own personalized packages, or companies can print regional versions or versions in different languages. It’s more flexible and it’s cheaper.

It looks to me—don’t get mad—I know that it’s supposed to be the globe, and that the soft X stands for Xerox, but it looks like a croquet ball to me. Was this a long process?

Well, there you are. It took longer than I thought it should have, because I tend to think that things should move pretty quickly. I mean, how tough is it? But the fact is that this is a corporate asset. You need to test it. You need to think about it. We wanted the logo to be more informal, and we wanted it to be more attractive in a three-dimensional world versus a two-dimensional world. We also wanted to make sure that the color palettes reflected the color business and the company.

Also, the new logo took a long time to roll out. The name is everywhere, so you have to transition everything. We immediately transitioned on the Web. But they were telling me it was going to take six months to get the logo on the outside of the headquarters building here. About two weeks after we made the announcement on the brand, I was in Egypt. And I’m coming out of the airport and there’s this huge billboard with the new brand on it. I was on the phone saying, “Guys, I’m in Egypt. [Laughs.] And there’s a billboard up. I think you can do better than six months on the headquarters building.”

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LOL! "...it looks like a croquet ball..."


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