Monday, November 2, 2009

Copier Deal Up For Re-Bid, IDAHO School District Hires "Consultant" to Help with RFP:LOL!

An update to the article written back in August, "Another "GACKED" Sales Forecast: Idaho School District Reneges on Xerox Deal" - RFP responses to be reviewed by the board in January; consultants guaranteeing lowest possible cost.

Pity the 34,000 students.

In July of 2009 the school board decided to go with Xerox after reviewing 6 or 7 responses - Xerox was some 10k per month more "expensive" than the second place bidder, Fisher’s Document Systems Inc.

The deal was to provide more than 120 copiers to the school district in southwest Idaho for 60 months.

Fisher's got ticked, challenged the RFP process and now almost 6 months later, the deal will be reviewed again and awarded, again. The Xerox bid included "bodies", Fisher's did not.

Who is to say that the district really needs Xerox staff roaming around the district installing toner and xerographic units - but the district is missing the humongous point, don't ya know.

The blaring error is the inability of these "molders of young minds" to recognize anything more then the CPC and equipment cost. The case is hopeless now, there is no way to focus on any cost savings other than lease payment per month.

No real savings.

Don't Hate the Player, Hate the Game -

Classic story really, the RFP process is inherently flawed and for decades we in the business machine niche have taken advantage of the short coming. That is of course if you consider selling equipment at 3 points "taking advantage".

Adding injury to insult, now there is a consultant involved. I wonder if his fees are taken out of the "savings" provided by his oversight.

We look forward to the award announcement sometime after January.






Reactions:

6 comments:

  1. I take offense to you calling IOWA...IDAHO!

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  2. OH MY GAWWWWWWD!!!!!

    I could say it was on purpose - but it wasn't...

    My Bad Completely - it's late at night...the sun was in my eyes...

    I have made the offensive mistake go away...

    Thanks for letting me know.

    g

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  3. oh no, not a consultant! Just what we need in this industry: Another money-grabbing, equipment-only focused, don't-care-about-the-consumer entity to deal with. We should definitely bash all the consultants, guess at how they might be compensated, jump to a conclusion that their process is flawed and just assume they are all in the pockets of the dealers. Whatever it takes to get the blame off of the poor dealer who is ignorant of what Xerox's strategy is and now only can afford two yachts and three vacation homes this year.

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  4. oh no, not a consultant! Just what we need in this industry: Another money-grabbing, equipment-only focused, don't-care-about-the-consumer entity to deal with. We should definitely bash all the consultants, guess at how they might be compensated, jump to a conclusion that their process is flawed and just assume they are all in the pockets of the dealers. Whatever it takes to get the blame off of the poor dealer who is ignorant of what Xerox's strategy is and now only can afford two yachts and three vacation homes this year.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Jeffery - let me guess, you're a consultant, right?

    And not only a consultant, a consultant who believes, "...Much has been made recently in the industry trade press about Managed Print Services (MPS). We view MPS as just another vendor equipment sales tool. Current costs are typically mythical as are the ostensible "savings" that result from an MPS program...we suspect it will fail..." - ProBuyers Blog

    LOL!

    I like consultants - and the slight was intended toward the District. Did you read the complete tome?

    But it is true, I will and often do, criticize consultants at every, single, possible turn; have no doubt.

    My criticism is born out of admiration and motivated to help the industry "do better". And if somebody takes offense, so be it, come back at me, tell me where and how I am wrong - I have no problem with that. Indeed, my mind is one that can actually be changed, on occasion.

    Here's the bold truth, if the District knew how to do their job better, they wouldn't find themselves in need of a copier consultant.

    If copier and leasing guys hadn't been so "crooked" over the past 2.5 decades, good firms like XIPPA wouldn't have any clients.

    But, when Selling Professionals, owners/principals included, want to accelerate along the curve, establish shortcuts to progress or obtain valuable insight, I am all for a consulting relationship.

    When discussing consulting, my big question is simply this, how in the world can a consultant keep his edge in an ever changing environment, by sitting outside that environment? Perhaps you have the answer.

    Specific to the School District; it seems to me, the District would have been just as well off if they had employed legal consul.

    But you swerve into dangerous waters with the "two yachts" explication - are you attempting to tell anyone how many yachts they can own? Really?...no, REALLY?

    Jeff, thank you very much for reading and commenting on my blog. As you can see, I liked your comment so much, I posted it twice (not sure how that happen). :-)

    By the way, I got 10 out of 10 - thank you for deeming me a "certified copier industry expert".

    Keep coming back.

    "...about Managed Print Services (MPS). We view MPS as just another vendor equipment sales tool..." - I love it!

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  6. Cut and Paste off the LinkedIn group - with Jeff's permision:


    Greg--Your "bold truth" about informed customers not needing consultants is absolutely hilarious to me. An "informed customer" is a classic oxymoron. Let's be honest here: The industry tells consumers only what it wants to have known. It's what the consumer DOESN'T KNOW and ISN'T TOLD that kills them in these deals. I'll guarantee you that there isn't one "informed customer" that can score 10 out of 10 on my test.

    Legal counsel as an alternative to a consultant? Are you serious? How do you propose that lawyer learn industry insider secrets? Sorry, how could I be so uninformed: I'm sure you and the rest of the industry will be glad to tell them all they need to know!

    I noted that your own website had a high-level industry executive recently acknowledging that "we want to get into MPS because we know it sells boxes." I guess that comment was just as funny?

    On your question about keeping up with industry knowledge, let me ask you: How do you keep up? You probably go to trade shows, go to product launch presentations, read press releases, talk to industry insiders, attend webinars and do other research, right? Is there a knowledge transfer station that consultants don't have access to? Please tell us since that secret bed of knowledge would help better the industry by improving the average consultant's knowledge.

    On the issue of yachts: First you cry poverty that the "poor dealer earns only three points" but now you openly are defending what we all know, which is that the industry is hugely profitable (forget 2009) and gouging the consumer is tolerated if not encouraged. So, which position is it that you're taking again?

    Instead of bashing consultants with uninformed and tired analog arguments, why don't you just accept them as a fact of life and move on? If you aren't well informed on how someone makes a livelihood, it's best if you don't express an opinion. There are many, many issues dealers aren't well equipped to handle, some technology related and some administrative. Isn't it obvious to you that dealers NEVER provide untainted advice? Maybe, just maybe, the consultant hired by this district intelligently created a fair and level playing field for all vendors, something consumers routinely struggle with. Would that be so bad?

    By Jeff Smith President, Pro Buyers LLC

    ReplyDelete