Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Losers Calling for "Unification"


It's a trap.

Obama and Donald sit down and talk and the news talkers are pushing the 'unity' talking point.

Sure, nice words and smiles looks fine and make us all feel warm and fuzzy. And yes, one should win with honor...and should lose with grace.

Under the guise of grace, the losers are cuddling up to the winner in an effort to further their losing agenda.

Trump won because of his words and actions resonated to a frustrated electorate - frustrated over the eight year old processes of Obama.  It is simple.

Trump must not change or acquiesce to the establishment. This will be difficult for he is now part of the machine we so adamantly challenged.

The Kids in America.

College campuses have always been a bastion for rebellion, a place to challenge beliefs and develop ideals - to stretch personal boundaries.

Unfortunately, nobody teaches the 'yudes', how to be an American or a winner.  Instead, "losing" fair and square, is equated with discrimination and victim-hood.  We've created a generation of whiners.

"I can't lose.  You're biased/racist/phobic!"

So the kids, who have nothing to worry about accept skipping class, head to the streets under the guidance of oh so many community organizers and burn stuff.

Tools. Useless.  Irrelevant.

Get back to your "Primitive Cultures" class.

America is not divided.  We are not tearing ourselves apart.

The biggest lie perpetuated in this campaign is that one candidate promotes dissension while the other pretends to "unify".  Evidence shows the exact opposite. Riots, shootings, protests, pontifications - voicing dissatisfaction with the results of an election - are coming from the side of 'understanding and Love'. ::sarcasm::

Here's the strategy: Create a problem, magnify the problem, force the electorate into a state of desperation and present yourself as the answer to the challenge you've created.

The media folks are stirring the pot, making it look like we are a nation of idiots, elitists and rubes.

Simple.


The United States of America survived the assassination of Kennedy, the twisted world of Nixon, the do nothing Carter Era, a sexual predator, 911, and the "Let's Make America Second" tour. Trump-World has got nowhere to go but up.





Thursday, November 10, 2016

The Establishment is Burning: What the 2016 US Presidential Election says about the imaging industry.


  • CNN was wrong.
  • NBC was wrong.
  • ABC was wrong.
  • CBS was wrong.
  • NPR was wrong.
  • Obama was wrong.
  • Hillary was wrong.
  • Biden was wrong.
  • Hollywood was wrong.
  • Starbucks was wrong.
  • The Huffington Post was wrong.
  • The pollsters were wrong.
  • The insiders were wrong.
  • Twitter was wrong.
  • The Establishment was wrong.
  • The Status-quo is wrong.

Experts pontificated how Trump had no experience in government. They vilified Trump supporters calling them racist, homophobic, morons - ‘deplorables’. Anti-Trump minions repeated over and over how Hillary was empathetic to the cause of women - although she’s chief enabler to her sexual predator husband.

Hillary followers trumpeted her stance on income equality - as she spewed to the masses clad in a $12,000.00 leisure suit.

Willing media operatives focused on the trivial content of lost emails, instead of explaining any government email found on a private device could be grounds for prosecution.

Everyday Hillary supporters overlooked all the signs, imagining most Americans would too.

They were wrong.

Millions of people knew Trump was going to win. They didn’t ‘hope’, they ‘knew’. They knew the polls were inaccurate at best but more likely propaganda from a willing media. They felt the studies skewed, talking heads biased, and celebrities no more than meat-puppets.

This scenario is not isolated, it did not occur in a vacuum. Indeed, our little niche - imaging - is a parallel universe.

Reflect for a moment on those who espouse “print is not dead”.
Remember the slanted, corporate sponsored, studies.
Consider the overwhelming dedication by some, to the copier-models of yesteryear.

Can the establishment drive innovation? Can the status quo increase volumes? If we repeat over and over, more people want to print, does that mean volumes will increase? Will the old guard remain monolithically poised as Overlord?

No.

Brexit, Trump, and the remote worker reflect symptoms of technological turbulence. In the second decade of the 21st century, all established structures are in jeopardy because technology is shifting the power structure from the establishment by unleashing and empowering individuals.

Old forms, like the GOP and the DNC, are giving way to the “inexperienced” visionaries. Archaic business models like brick and mortar retail, taxi, lodging and continuous manufacturing fight and ultimately surrender to Amazon, Uber, AirBNB and 3D printing.

Office print and those who try to perpetuate the OEM/Dealer/Customer model are doomed to walk the same path as Hillary.

It is the way of things…






Wednesday, October 5, 2016

HP & Samsung: A Faster Horse?


There is no evidence that Ford uttered the phrase, "“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

Still, the feeling is relevant - "If we had asked OEMs what they wanted, they would have said dozens of more copiers..." Of course, we only ask OEMs, not customers.  Customers, might say things like, 'fewer copiers' and who wants to hear that?

Print volume is down, printer hardware placements are off, but studies(IDC) reveal growth in contracted hardware somewhere between 4% and 40% increase.

Could this mean while printers are dying off, copier volume is increasing?  No.  As the MpS trend continues, a portion of print volume is captured as a 'contractual' type.  It wasn't tracked like this before MpS; same images, different billing scheme.

No. New. Clicks.

From a great webinar, BPO Media

Industry chatter supports the IDC report as dealers report stable and growing MpS/Contractual volume.  Following the logic, HP's do-over makes sense.  They are digging in somebody else backyard.

Who knew?

HP Inc., and her crew, are excited about this turn, it is a new wrinkle in an otherwise boring and waning realm.

Yet,
  • An HP/Samsung adventure is not disruptive - the HP Series II was "disruptive".
  • The Mopier and Hawk were not disruptive - the Internet was "disruptive".
  • Pagewide ink is not disruptive - the Gutenberg was "disruptive".
The effects will be subject of discussion for months, but the industry won't buck, markets won't gallup into 'black' and end-users will not race to print and copy like it was 1999.

What does it all mean?

For the Copier Dealer - "Isn't this horse dead? Kick it again."

This steed has been around the track a few times; the pitch borrowed from Edgeline:

"IT departments trust the HP logo."
"Your cost with HP is less than copiers."
"We're looking for loyal partners."

All true.

Just a few things to remember:
  • HP believes everybody works for them - even clients
  • HP will not be happy with being your 'second' choice - the rules change every October
  • Your clients who purchase HP, are really HP's customers, not yours - it's not your name on the box
If you haven't been approached by mother blue, you are not on their radar.  HP is hitting up the larger dealers for 'partnerships'.  Pinstripe suits, great meeting venues and bags of cash - what could possibly go wrong?

For VARs - "Rebates"

Print still sucks and you don't want anything to do with hot machines, dirty boxes and a help desk inundated with paper jam questions.

So HP will take that headache.  Contractual programs supported by HP, all you need do is work your customers, sell the machines and pass it on to the blue Goddess.

What could possibly go wrong?

Customer - "I watch NASCAR"

The trifecta winner is the customer.  You know clients love to complain about copiers.  They leave sticky notes and write meme's about their multifunction device.  Pictures of exploded toner flood the inter-webs.

Cheaper, smaller, simpler devices will rule the day and nobody does A3 better than HP.

At the Finish Line, its HP - "By a Nose"

Not like Man-O-War or Secretariat, the Blue Gorilla may win the day by being the biggest, not the best.  The sheer size of HP allows great losses before the organization fades into darkness.  Also, this isn't the same HP that purchased and arguably destroyed COMPAQ, Palm, and WebOS - the names are different - maybe

For dealers and VARs, if you're into supporting devices that mark paper, I would jump on the HP wagon.  Keep a clear head, understand that HP's loyalty only goes as far as stockholder's wishes and dividends.

You will never be a true, Partner.  Form an alliance, benefit from the HP logo, sell a few more devices and keep your options open.  It could be a short but profitable ride.

Indeed, when that Last War Horse of a printer is sold, it will be an HP.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

HP, Inc. to Buy The Largest Toner Recycler on the Planet

9/2016

"We will own the third party toner market and then we will destroy the third party toner market."

In what can only be described as one of the boldest moves by an OEM to control its destiny, HP Inc. is positioning to 'disrupt' the aftermarket supplies niche with its $1.1 billion take over of "...the world’s largest collector and recycler of imaging supplies..."

After years of competing with firms that 'recycle' empty cartridges by re-labeling, re-assembling or simply manufacturing exact duplicates of their product, HP Inc., in one intrepid motion, becomes the largest supplier of recycled toner cartridges - not only HP, but a multitude of other manufacture's aftermarket supplies are now under the control of HP, Inc.

The industry is rife with shocked response...

###

Let not your heart be troubled, the above statement is a journey into the absurd, macabre and fiction.

But imagine the consequences of such a move.

The next time you complain about how HP has "screwed its customers" by initiating software that checks toner cartridges for a chip, consider mother blue setting up her own recycling factory south of the border.

On the other side of the coin, when HP exclaims the 'disruption of the A3 industry', take it with a grain of salt.  Sixteen new copiers does not a 'disruption' make; buying her way into the aftermarket niche would cause great turbulence.

Food for thought...


Friday, September 23, 2016

You Should Be Selling ITAM with Copiers, Printers and MpS


Gartner - "IT asset management (ITAM) provides an accurate account of technology asset lifecycle costs and risks to maximize the business value of technology strategy, architecture, funding, contractual and sourcing decisions.”

There is so much turbulence in the industry today, it's tough to figure out what to do.
  1. Margins continue to drop
  2. The OEMs are locked in a War for the remaining 'clicks'and you're in the line of fire
  3. Customers are demanding more than "scan once, print many'
We know you're going to survive.  What can you do to thrive?  How about selling asset lifecycle management?

There is a great way to remain relevant in the eyes of your customers and sell more services without the hassle of establishing third party partnerships, investing in a NOC or falling into a huge time-suck.

  • No need to retrain you sales staff.
  • No heavy investment in software packages that require an MBA to operate and understand.
  • Keep your existing tool set

With Atlas, you'll offer a service most IT departments thirst for - IT Asset Management.(ITAM)

Register below for our introductory webinar.  We'll talk about ways to solidify your existing book of business and easily pivot into new streams of revenue.

Change is inevitable; with Atlas, it doesn't need to hurt.



Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Samsung & HP: Another Technology Firm Sells Off Print

Kali
9/14/16

Check out the first article about Samsung/HP, here.

Samsung, recognizing print’s demise, ejects 6,000 employees and 6,500 patents - HP, Inc., like the family dog, sniffs up the crumbs.  Todd Pike looks to be the smartest guy in the room.

Just three years after marching into the world of print and boldly pronouncing, "We're poised to lead a paradigm shift. We feel the world of printing is changing.”, the Korean chip maker waves the white flag, retreating to the fiery world of cellphones and silicon.

HP is buying Samsung's 'formidable' print/copy apparatus.  It wasn't more than five years ago, Samsung built a copier that worked.  No really, I attended the roll-out in Jersey.  A couple of new qualities they pitched were aligned output vs. skewed and variable sized dots.

Stunning.

So now, the questions begin:
  • What does this mean for the industry? Not much.
  • Is this bad news for the Japanese OEMs? Of course.
  • How does Canon come out of this? Like Oliver Twist, "Please sir..." 
  • Who is the big winner? Mother Blue, Kali, goddess of destruction.
So too, do the pontifications:

  • "HP's acquisition of Samsung gives them the opportunity to disrupt and truly innovate in this space at a time when most other OEM's are struggling. It's a real Game Changer!!!" - LinkedIN
  • "This will shake things up a bit!!" - LinkedIN
  • "HP to acquire Samsung's Print business is big news and will further enable our managed services business. We are driving disruptive change by bringing value to our clients." - HP
Here's my take:

Not disruptive; turbulent.  

HP shelled out less for Samsung than Ricoh for RiKON and may spend half as much on marketing into A3.  Regardless of what happens on the OEM side of life, no degree of consolidation, no merger or acquisition, is going to entice customers into generating more 'clicks'.

This is War.  HP Inc. is maneuvering to be the last standing.

Today, Monday, September 12, 2016, you are witnessing the beginning of the greatest campaign in our slight history.  HP Inc.'s marketing war chest is huge and they're not doubling down on print, the farm is on the line.

But what else can they do?

In The War for Marks on Paper, HP Prevails.

There should be no doubt, HP Inc. is in it to win it.  Even with the decline, the last person selling buggy whips is still the only one selling buggy whips.

With the infrastructure and money to put service trucks into every major market in the U.S.,  HP Inc. looks like a mega-dealer.

Think about that.

Supplies and service direct from the OEM.

Every service manager should be shaking in their boots at the prospect of HP Inc. riding into their town.  And now, HP Inc. has a value proposition which includes A3.

This is not the same HP that purchased Palm and Compaq.  These aren't the folks who clustered Hawk or propped Edgeline as the next coming, only to let it fail.  No.

HP Inc. is the real deal; they've got a plan, money and can reach from the F100 boardrooms to the SMB kitchen tables.  The

But enough about print.  Print is not the end-all and HP Inc. is not infallible - how can you differentiate yourself from the big MpS players?

Don't sell MpS.

Instead, offer IT Lifecycle Management.  If you can sell copiers or managed services, I know IT Directors will take you more seriously when you suggest helping them manage their IT asserts instead of "lowering print costs by 30%".